Why Localisation is Important


At The Language Factory, we believe in talking to people in their own language.  That’s why we employ mother tongue translators with over five years of experience in translation: they have developed a level of understanding which is un-matched and ensures that those you’re communicating with, really understand what you’re trying to say.

How, though, does localisation and translation impact the communication process? Well, first, a few interesting statistics:

  • Any company looking to reach, say, 80 per cent of the world’s population would need 83 different languages to do so.  (Common Sense Advisory, Evolution and Revolution in Translation Management, 2008)
  • 56.2 per cent of consumers believe that the ability to obtain information about products or services in their own language is more important than the actual cost. (Common Sense Advisory, Can’t Read, Won’t Buy:  Why Language Matters on Global Websites, 2006)
  • The ability to clearly and accurately communicate in multiple languages is a critical success factor for cross-border merger and acquisition deals.
  • 65 per cent of multinational enterprises believe localisation is either important or very important for achieving higher revenues. (California State University at Chico, 2007).

 

Obviously data isn’t everything, but it’s worth highlighting just how much value localisation can provide. We believe that localised translation is invaluable, and here’s why:

  • It’s important to speak to people in their own language.  This ensures that both parties fully understand each other and removes the risk of offence being given or of any incorrect information being put across.
  • Localisation specialists can ensure that your documentation is in keeping with the customs and traditions of the region.
  • It ensures you speak directly to the relevant people.  Localisation means being accurate to the country, rather than just the language.  For instance, someone translating into English will need to take into account the subtle differences between for example American English, Australian English and UK English.  Spanish spoken in Peru isn’t identical to Spanish spoken in Venezuela.  Localisation ensures that no communications fall between the cracks.
  • It helps you keep on top of specifics.  Country variations also mean other matters need to be taken into account.  For instance, American English uses a different date format to UK English (MM/DD/YY compared to DD/MM/YY).  Different regions will also use different financial currencies.  These specifics matter.
  • Marketing data remains accurate.  The Language Factory specialises in translating marketing data, information that needs to be accurate in order to be worth anything.  Localisation again plays a key part in ensuring this.  To give an example, surveys taken in the UK will commonly ask participants to choose a number between one and 10 to indicate positive or negative, with 10 being the most positive response.  In Germany, though, a similar scale would usually see one being the most positive response.  If there were any issues in translation, some very ambiguous results could be obtained if participants simply assumed the standard.

Read more about Localisation

To find out more about how localisation can help your company reach new audiences, contact The Language Factory today on +44 1727 862722.

 

"This was my first time working with a language agency at all and I must say that it was really nice to work with you. I'm looking forward to working together again in the future!"

Market Research Agency

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